Vantage Points Series : The Fur Trade




American Forts on the Souris River  
Web  / PDF
Vol.  III, Page 17
The American Fur Company’s attempt to lay claim to the furs along the Souris River
About 1810 - 1828
Ash House  
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 9
Ash House was built on the north shore of the Souris as a canoe fort.
1795 - 1797
The Assiniboine 
Web  / PDF
Vol.  II, Page 47
At home in southwest Manitoba for centuries.
Fort Desjarlais 
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 13
Fort Desjarlais is remembered today as the most prominent and successful of the Souris River trading posts.
Fort Mr. Grant 
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 12
Fort Desjarlais is remembered today as the most prominent and successful of the Souris River trading posts.
John Pritchard  
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 11
A Normally Competent Fur Trader Loses His Way
Lauder Sandhills  
Web  / PDF
Vol. I, Page 3
The creation, habitiation and settlement of a unique area.
Lena House  
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 10

1801 – 1802
Lena House is one of two fur trading posts which were located on Turtle Mountain, though its exact location has never been determined.
Mandan Trail    
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I Page 5

Before – and shortly after – Europeans made contact with aboriginal peoples in the Turtle Mountain area, a First Nations group called the Mandan traded in the region.
Métis Intermediaries  
Web  / PDF
Vol.  III, Page 20

Métis interpreters, present during the signing of Canada’s early Numbered Treaties and an integral part of the Boundary Commission Survey, were more than mere translators – they were peacekeepers and diplomats.
1872—1877
Métis Wintering Communities   
Web  / PDF
Vol.  I, Page 16

1840s – 1870s

Rise of the Métis Identity    
Web  / PDF
Vol.  II, Page 6

1801 – 1802
A new Nation born on the North Western prairies.


Vantage Points Series

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